Here's How Easy it is to Crack Your iPhone's Passcode [Video]

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Comments

  • fas
    fas Posts: 2,297
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    What are you a spy or something?
  • Kao Saephan
    Kao Saephan Posts: 41
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    If the person who found (or stole) your lost iphone, chances of them knowing how to recover your wiped data are very small. Even if they had the means to do so, they won't be able to recover everything. Chances are, whoever found your phone will just erase everything and probably resell it for money.What you've outlined to keep your data clean is just going overboard. If people are that concerned and think they're that important, it's probably best to just avoid smart phones, computers and the internet as a whole.
  • Lahey
    Lahey Posts: 32
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    The outline presented is among the most effective currently available to civilian users. Mobile devices are not permitted where data security and privacy are paramount, but for the casual user there remains the possibility that important personal and confidential data are on the device. The outline provides at least one method of minimizing potential damage. Whether you are concerned or not remains up to you of course. I have to admit the company did not do as much as many clients would have liked to see regarding security on the i-devices. However, it is my personal feeling that things are improving. As for computers and the internet, that's a huge subject. However, Lion's implementation of full-disk "FileVault" encryption is a positive step, as is Disk Utility's ability to erase free space. Again, the issue with SSDs remains, as do some LAN-related FileVault vs. Time Machine issues. However any step to protect data security ought to be seen as a step forward, and I don't think your use of the word "overboard" was as responsible as it could have been.
  • Blah
    Blah Posts: 18
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    they could just hold power and home button for 10 seconds to reset..
  • Rounak
    Rounak Posts: 269
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    video has been removed
  • A1d3N
    A1d3N Posts: 23
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    The pirate bay will host this software at some point. I agree with whoever posted about it using geohot's exploit. But, I best they didn't pay for it as its been given away for free and been out a long time. Their website doesn't tell you the price of this software without getting in touch with them 1st so I bet you it costs a lot.Anyway, am I not right in believing that the passcode information is stored in /private/var/Keychains/keychain-2.db(viewable from any iPhone explorer tool)And am I not wrong in believing that no brute for attack is needed (although Cain is capable and free) because the hash keys are hosted on the iphonewiki site?Any SQL browser should let you view the keychain record if lifted from an iPhone and decrypted using the already know keys. (no DFU mode needed) It's basic stuff people. In fact, @iphonehackx should try it, then blog about the results and credit me :)@aiden_howarth
  • Lahey
    Lahey Posts: 32
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    A useful reference is DSD's iOS hardening guide:http://www.dsd.gov.au/publications/iOS5_Hardening_Guide.pdfGood enough for government work, as the saying goes.
  • filthyjason
    filthyjason Posts: 21
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    I use the Vapor Pro case which doesn't allow for the SIM to be removed without taking the case apart w/ a tiny little phillips screwdriver. Also, power / home doesn't work, that also generates a failed power off event and iCaughtU sends a pic etc. It'll also detect a rogue SIM (if they decide to try to use it) and send an email from that too. It's a cool app and while it's not going to be 100%, it's way better than what Apple will do for you. My buddy has a Verizon phone so there isn't a SIM issue for him.
  • Stephen
    Stephen Posts: 33
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    Its software built into a specialized hardware solution with a large assortment of cablings, between $4,000-$15,000 per kit.